Ten years ago, when the Nissan Leaf appeared as the first widely available electric car, the only drivers really interested in buying it were the first users to take a short trip. With only 100 miles and a new consumer item later called “various concerns,” Leaf had a limited appeal. But in the years that followed, advances in battery design and packaging meant miles, expanding the acceptance of electric vehicles. Gradually, more and more buyers can imagine using the EV on their way to and from work or to do some work in the city.

Modern EVs range from pokey and basic to fast and fancy, with price tags to match. But if you don’t need a lot of range, some of today’s high-end electric cars can be found at the average price of a sedan, and even lower if you incorporate organizational and government incentives. We have collected the most affordable electric cars you can buy today and have given you advice on significant options on the horizon. If you have been hesitant to dip your toe in electric water (an irresponsible metaphor), now is a good time to make a low-risk jump.

2022 Nissan Leaf (starting at $28,375)

Does an EV surpass its competitors and cost less than others? That’s Leaf’s formula, and it’s hard to resist. With a range of 149 miles on its affordable base trim (the larger battery version of your choice, the Leaf Plus, it can travel 226 miles), Nissan offers a useful distance and is the cheapest car in its class. It is also fast and fast and handles well. Limited storage and folding back seats are the only things we hold. By 2022, Nissan reduced the price of Leaf across the board compared to the 2021 models. Even better, Nissan has increased the amount of content in two lower trim levels.

2022 Mini Cooper SE (starting at $30,750)

The Mini usually offers better and more expensive cars than most conventional cars. But it is trying something different with its new Mini Cooper SE. Cooper SE, based on Hardtop 2 Door, is all about style, fun, and accessibility. With an average EPA range of 110 miles, it can travel a considerable distance from any of the other models on our list. But that distance is still enough to travel, and we were able to squeeze 150 miles on the Cooper SE in our real-world EV test. By 2022, the Mini Cooper discovers new front and rear bump information, as well as a standard digital metal panel.

2021 Hyundai Ioniq Electric (starting at $34,250)

Today’s Ioniq Electric has a much wider range than the model it was originally offered – a larger battery arrived last year and increased the EPA distance to 170 miles (compared to 124 miles earlier). Ioniq Electric also acquired charging power at Level 2 and Level 3, increased horsepower, and advanced technology features as a major infotainment indicator. It may have a few downsides, such as a small and uncomfortable back seat, but overall it is worth a look.

2022 Hyundai Kona (starting at $35,225)

The  Kona Electric offers a wide range of electric lists for its price, attractive interior, and a wide range of standard equipment. It’s also fast, it’s fast and it’s fun to drive. By 2022, it gets a renewed exterior and interior, as well as a number of additional features. Below, the hind legs are strong (as in the gas-powered Kona) and availability is limited in some states.

2022 Volkswagen ID.4 (starting at $41,190)

The Volkswagen ID.4 is the first VW car designed to be electric from the ground up. It is marketed as an SUV, but the ID.4 is actually smaller than VW’s Tiguan compact SUV and looks like a hatchback. That being said, its passenger base is almost identical to that of the Tiguan. We do not consider this car to be a fun car in the sense of having fun, but it makes for comfortable transportation that we do not care about driving every day.

2022 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid (starting at $27,825)

The Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid is actually similar to its standard hybrid counterpart: it can recharge its battery pack from an electrical source. With up to 29 miles of electric power and a standard four-cylinder engine that should take over when the juice runs out, the Ioniq PHEV (a car plug-in hybrid electric) combines fuel efficiency with power flow for consumers who are not yet aware of the discovery. caught on the highway with a depleted battery. Ioniq is not the most refined PHEV on the outside – its interior can be high, the boarding company and its engine lazy – but it is a solid price proposal improved with last year’s updates to infotainment and driver safety systems.

2022 Toyota Prius Prime (starting at $29,245)

An automaker who expanded the hybrid class in a way we know with one hand, Toyota quickly added a new Prius charger that changed its game. The 25-mile [2 km] Prime warehouse is large enough to accommodate most drivers throughout the day. When those miles are completed, the Prime four-cylinder four-cylinder engine will take a different route. In Level 2 (240-volt) connection, the battery can be fully charged at the time of a movie or a dinner. Premier also added Android Auto functionality last year, making it compatible with most phones in the market (Apple CarPlay was already supported).

2022 Kia Niro Plug-In Hybrid (starting at $30,765)

When it comes to full EVs, the Niro EV is one of our favorites, but it also has a good price (albeit very small after-tax compensation). That is what makes the Niro PHEV so attractive. You get official hatchback performance, good fuel economy, and 26 miles of total electricity. If your needs primarily drive young people to sports in the city, the Niro PHEV is a solid solution. It comes well-equipped with standard features, which include excellent smartphone integration and infotainment technology. Aside from its appearance in the SUV, the Niro pulls only the front wheels, but that doesn’t detract from its excellent hatchback/crossover features.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV Crossover (starting at $33,500)

In addition to freshening the subcompact Bolt EV hatchback for 2021, Chevrolet will introduce a taller and roomier crossover SUV version that will offer General Motors’ Super Cruise semi-autonomous driving system. We would expect similar specs to the current Bolt EV, which can run for 259 miles on a charge.

2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E (starting at $44,000)

It was expected to debut in 2020, the Mach-E is a Mustang-flavored electric SUV that promises to deliver a range of around 300 miles on a charge in both rears and all-wheel drive platforms. Already Ford has announced price cuts of between $1,000 and $3,000 for the Mach-E, which will now start at $44,000.

2022 Nissan Ariya (starting at $45,000)

The Nissan Ariya is expected to go on sale by the fall of 2022, as the first of a series of new battery-powered models. It’s a dual-motor crossover SUV about the size of the automaker’s Rogue that will come wrapped in radically distinctive styling, and could run for as much as 300 miles on a charge. It will reportedly come with the latest generation of the automaker’s semi-self-driving system.